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Shhh, I’m going to let you in on a little secret… I can’t stand waste!!! And, whilst I’m just as partial as the next crafter to a bit of fabric eye candy, I just can’t bring myself to throw away a scrap of fabric. Old clothing gets recycled through either friends or charity or if all else fails they are cut up for cleaning rags! A few years ago I lost a lot of weight and this netted me a decent amount of linen and denim for my stash. I also reserved a lovely dark brown suede jacket… I couldn’t get rid of it so into the stash it went.

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Recently, I was lucky enough to be treated to a new phone. Now my track record with techy stuff is pretty poor, so I needed something to protect it from the plague of dust, crumbs, stray sweets and random bits of kiddy junk that lurk in the depths of my bag. All I needed was a simple pouch and having priced up new ones (and choked in shock) my thoughts turned to my jacket. Admittedly it’s not every day that you take to a £100 jacket with a seam ripper, and I can’t say that my stomach wasn’t churning as I did it, but I ploughed on and ended up with some really nice panels of fine suede.

I was so pleased with the outcome of my repurposed/upcycled jacket project that I thought I’d share how to make it.

Let’s get started… 

You will need:

  • a small panel of suede, though you could make it from cotton
  • a small piece of fusible fleece
  • a small piece of satin or other lining material
  • a heavy weight needle for your machine if using suede

Step 1: measure your phone and add 4cms to the width, to allow for seams and a little give for its depth, and add 2cm to the length for seams. I ended up with two rectangles of suede that were 16cm x 10cm. I then cut 2 pieces of fusible fleece and 2 pieces of lining satin to the same size.

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Fuse the fleece onto the wrong side of the suede. It may not fuse so well, I ended up using a couple of bulldog clips to hold it in place whilst sewing.

Step 2: Take the lining fabric and place it on top of a suede panel, right sides together. Sew a straight line across the width on one end. Do this for both pieces of suede. For sewing suede you will need a heavy weight needle in your machine, I couldn’t get a suede/leather needle locally so used the toughest looking denim needle I could buy. I also used a walking foot for this project; this grips the fabric from the top as your feed dogs grip from the bottom which is ideal for preventing slippage when sewing multiple layers.

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Now lay both panels flat and open them out, they should look something like this.

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Step 3: Place the panels on top of each other right sides facing, pin the lining together (you’ll not get pins through suede – use a couple of bulldog clips instead). Now sew right around the entire rectangle, leaving a 5cm opening on the end of the lining to turn it the right way in.

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Step 4: Trim the edges and clip the corners and then turn the whole project right side out through the gap you left on the previous stage.

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Now all you need to do is stitch the gap closed and stuff your lining down inside your suede pouch. There you go, your phone should fit snugly into its new home.

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If you wanted to you could add a flap with a velcro closure to cover the top of the pouch but I wasn’t particularly wanting that, just a simple pouch will do for now and it’s a fairly snug fit so that phone isn’t going to slip out too easily. By the way, it does slide completely inside the pouch, it’s just peeping out on that last photo to demonstrate the fit!

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